Saturday, May 10, 2008

Journey by Angie Ledbetter

I've thought a lot about the end of our physical existence lately. Although it is agonizing to watch a dear loved one at the end of their time, even in the last days (or weeks or months) of decline, I find things to be thankful for.

There's nothing nice about brain cancer, or any terminal illness. There is, however, a beauty in the end days if we look closely enough for them.

Being a caregiver gives me a chance to return to my mother some of the same things she gave me in my earliest years: unconditional love, pampering, tender bodily care, hugs, favorite foods, and the comfort of being near.

I also realize the blessings of Mom's own personal battle with the deadly tumor -- she is not suffering physical pain, her long term memories and personality remain, she still has her joyous sense of humor and laughter, and her family and friends have gathered closely to be with her often. Those who love her have been able to spend precious time with her. I know of others who have not been so fortunate. A friend's brother who has this same glioblastoma tumor, located in a different lobe of the brain, are dealing with very negative personality changes. How hard that must be on his family. We all know nightmare stories of pain and suffering. Every day, I am grateful that this is not my mother's journey, and am reminded that in death, there is beauty; there are things in which to be thankful.

I thank all of you who are praying for Mother and for our family. It means a lot. It means the most. *smile*

4 comments:

Kathryn Magendie said...

and how grateful your mother and father must be to you .... I will keep on keeping on keeping you all in my thoughts....

Barbara Quinn said...

You are fortunate to have such a loving relationship with your mom and I know she's drawing great comfort from having you with her. These difficult times have a way of setting us on course again, of showing us what really does matter. You're in my thoughts...

Nannette Croce said...

Inspiring thoughts. My uncle who died two years ago in Hospice taught me that the best legacy a loved one can leave is facing death with grace and dignity.

Anonymous said...

Angie,
Your friends and family are in our prayers. Your parents have touched more people than they realize. The twins they raised have the ability to see the world that others wish they could. We love you and yours.
Oren

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